Posted in Writing Nothing until Something Appears

Writing, Art and that Awkward Dance

Completing the artistic process is a  little like dating in High School, at some point you have to ask the one you want to dance.

I see the writer as the president of the chess club, fidgeting with his or her hands.  The visual artist,  the painter or sculptor,  is the prom royalty because of his or her beauty and grace.  And of course the preforming artist, that drama club kid,  is in the middle of the dance floor flashing jazz hands without a care in the world.

Anyone who has made it past senior year, knows these labels do not mean anything.  So why am I painting this analogy?  Every artist wants to complete the artistic process, meaning everyone wants an audience.  It’s an acceptance, a validation and a connection.

Even as I write these words, I can hear the argument, “I create art for myself…I don’t care what people think.”

So I am retracting the words “every artist” and replacing them with “most artists”.  This is to accommodate that hobbyist who paints the painting or writes the words, admires it and then hides it in the bottom of the darkest closet.   My argument is that artist is creating art but not completing the artistic process.  Art, as I define it, is a language (probably because I am a writer) that communicates on a deeper, more spiritual plane.   I see a clear giver and receiver in this exchange.  In this definition an audience of one does complete the artistic process, so all closet artists can relax since they are the artist and viewer.

For anyone else who wants to expand their art beyond themselves, they have to face possible rejection before they can step one foot onto the dance floor.  Yes I’m back to that analogy.  And yes as a writer, I have described myself as a cliche of nerdiness,  not because I lack social skills but rather because as a writer my art requires a little patience. For example when I go to my friend’s studio and he shows me his latest oil painting.  It takes my eye a millisecond  to absorb the visual information, even if I dwell on the feedback, it costs me very little time or energy to participate .  When I show up with my writing, I am asking him to sit and read which requires a commitment of  time.  This is why the writer is the nerd in my silly analogy, if the desired dance partner stops long enough to give the writer a chance, he or she might be surprised with a great time.

How do other artists feel? Do we have to depend on the reader to complete the process?  As I write, I can see both views…let me know

Author:

A.E. LaSage In her series of shorts, Behind the Bridge to Nowhere, A. E. LaSage introduced a collection of characters who live their fiction in Ketchikan, Alaska. They continue to live beyond those pages and (with others) appear in new adventures. A bit of a character herself, she enjoys finding the absurd and personal in the ordinary.

One thought on “Writing, Art and that Awkward Dance

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s